"That’s the problem with putting others first; you’ve taught them you come second."
read that, again.    (via lovesoey)

She approaches a temple where she stops to watch a wedding in procession. A young bride and groom in traditional kimono walk under a parasol with their family. Charlotte looks as the nervous, young bride clutches her mother’s hand. The young groom walks along with them. Charlotte is moved by the whole scene, the beauty of the temple and the wedding party. Her eyes well up. (Dir. Sofia Coppola, Lost in Translation)

Marie Antoinette Deleted Scene: Second Opera

This opera scene came after Marie Antoinette has become Queen and thinks everyone just loves her and she’s sharing some German opera with the people of France. We took this scene out because it felt like one opera too many and losing it made the other two opera scenes stronger and contrast more, her first opera where the people in the city are so taken with her and applaud her and then the last one where they’ve turned on her, and she sees for the first time that they don’t adore her.

- Sofia Coppola

Tom Hardy as Raumont in Marie Antoinette (2006)

sofiacoppolaofficial:

marie antoinette (2006)

ragsmartinjones:

Designed by the Parisian carriagemaker Francien with detailed input from the Duc de Choiseul, the berline looked for all the world like a giant jewel box. Its front, side, and rear panels fashioned almost entirely of glass, and its ornate, garlanded trim-work wrought from white, rose, and yellow gold, drew whistles of admiration from the crowd. On its solid gold slab of a roof, bouquets of flowers of gold in different colors waved gracefully in the slightest breeze. Magnificent golden harnesses tethered a team of eight white horses to the carriage; the tall feathers in their manes bobbed in time as they snorted and pawed at the ground. Inside the berline, plush crimson upholstery depicted the Four Seasons, painstakingly embroidered in golden thread by a master craftsman named Trumeau. 
Yet no one had thought to prepare the girl for the challenges her future held in store. She had simply been told that she had won the most glittering prize that anyone, even a Hapsburg archduchess, could possibly hope to obtain. - Queen of Fashion

ragsmartinjones:

Designed by the Parisian carriagemaker Francien with detailed input from the Duc de Choiseul, the berline looked for all the world like a giant jewel box. Its front, side, and rear panels fashioned almost entirely of glass, and its ornate, garlanded trim-work wrought from white, rose, and yellow gold, drew whistles of admiration from the crowd. On its solid gold slab of a roof, bouquets of flowers of gold in different colors waved gracefully in the slightest breeze. Magnificent golden harnesses tethered a team of eight white horses to the carriage; the tall feathers in their manes bobbed in time as they snorted and pawed at the ground. Inside the berline, plush crimson upholstery depicted the Four Seasons, painstakingly embroidered in golden thread by a master craftsman named Trumeau.

Yet no one had thought to prepare the girl for the challenges her future held in store. She had simply been told that she had won the most glittering prize that anyone, even a Hapsburg archduchess, could possibly hope to obtain. - Queen of Fashion

A-Tisket, A-Tasket Behind the Scenes 

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Canon EOS 5D Mark III
foodishouldnoteat:

if you love food follow my blog!

foodishouldnoteat:

if you love food follow my blog!

Via
Canon EOS 5D Mark III